PDGA: Is it Fact or Fiction?

In Bounds or Out?

Nearly every PDGA tournament has them, the self-proclaimed PDGA police who know every rule about disc golf. Today we are putting it to the test; are the rules they are citing fact, or are they fiction?

This Q&A is in no way, an official representation from the PDGA. This myth busting is according to our researched interpretation of the PDGA rules. If you have thoughts to add, we’d love to hear them below, unless you are simply an angry troll. If you have a tendency to be a troll, find a different way to present your thoughts, and then present them.

#1 You Must Use A Mini Marker to Mark Your Lie

(To clarify, this question is asking if you must use a mini to mark your lie, prior to your next throw).
Both.
You may leave your previous throw on the ground and treat that as your lie, so long as it meets the following criteria: the disc naturally fell in a definite position, it is not elevated, and no casual relief is needed (Rule 802.03-B). If your disc did fall into any of that criteria, you must mark your lie. You may choose to mark your lie if your lie is in bounds, but within one meter of out of bounds.

Essentially, most throws will likely not require a mini to mark your lie. However, using a mini may be to your advantage, therefore it is a good common practice.

#2 Fact or Fiction: You cannot throw from out of bounds.

Fact.
You must have all supporting points in-bounds (Rule 802.04-B-3).

#3 Fact or Fiction: When you mark your lie, the object used must be a mini marker disc.

Fact.
The wording on this can be a bit confusing, as the the rules state “a mini marker disc may be used” (802.03-B, emphasis added). The word may is in reference to if you need to drop a mini at all, or use the original disc as the lie. All other language in the PDGA rule book states “mini marker disc” for when marking your lie with an object may be necessary.

#4 Fact or Fiction: Your feet cannot come off the pad when you are teeing off.

Fiction.
The rule states “Supporting point contact outside the teeing area is allowed if it comes before or after, and not at, the moment the disc is released” (802.01). The question, however may need additional clarity. Your supporting points must be in bounds during the release. That means that a run-up which takes you off of the tee-pad is OK. It also means that one foot may be off the ground, in front of the tee-pad, so long as the disc is released before that foot comes into contact with the ground.

Disc golf may need instant replay to properly rule this one. Until that is allowed, if a supporting point is outside of the tee-box during release, it will have to be called by somebody other than the thrower (802.04 E and F).

This also means that if you don’t like where the tee-pad is located, you cannot tee of from the side of the pad.

#5 Fact or Fiction: It is impossible to foot fault on a drive.

Fiction.
See answer immediately above.

#6 Fact or Fiction: You may call a foot fault on yourself.

Fiction.
There was a time when this was true. However, because a foot fault may work to your advantage on an errant throw, it is not allowed to call a foot fault on yourself (8020.04 E).

#7 Fact or Fiction: You must allow those further away from the basket to putt first

Fact.
The away player throws first. However, “To facilitate flow of play, a player who is not the away player may throw if the away player consents.” (801.05 D).

If a player throws out of turn, without consent of the away player, it may be called a courtesy violation.

#8 Fact or Fiction: Do you have to tee off by lead score?

Fact.
If you play out of turn, it is considered a courtesy violation. Contrary to the “away player” where a player may consent to allowing another to throw first, the tee off order has no such courtesy allowed.[/learn_more]

#9 Fact or Fiction: A player that does not hole out (finish a hole) gets an automatic 7

Fiction.
A penalty applies, but it depends on the players intention.

Intentionally did not hole out: It is considered withdrawal from the tournament (803.03.G.3)
Unintentionally did not hole out: It is the number of strokes made, plus three penalty strokes. For example, if you forget to place your disc in the basket on a 1 foot putt. One stroke for holing out, and two for the misplayed hole.

#10 Fact or Fiction: If you lazily throw a disc back to your bag, for convenience, that’s a one stroke penalty”

Unclear.
1: The PDGA defines a throw as: “The propulsion of a disc by a player that results in a new lie.” (800.02)
2: In the PDGA Q&A, the PDGA says: “You can throw it with your foot if that works for you. Note: That also means that kicking the disc can be penalized as a practice throw. Applicable Rules: 800 Definitions (Throw).” (Q&A, Q29)
3: The PDGA Q&A also says: “The throw begins when movement of the disc in the intended direction begins. A disc dropped or knocked out before or during a backswing does not count as a throw.”

Our call is that this needs additional clarity. There are a number of arguments that can be made citing these two examples. The argument I’ll be using “But Tournament Director, I intended to throw towards the basket, not the pond.”

#11 Fact or Fiction: If a player lands in casual water he MUST play it from that position.

Fiction
“A player may obtain relief only from the following obstacles that are on or behind the lie: casual water, loose leaves or debris, broken branches no longer connected to a tree, motor vehicles, harmful insects or animals, players’ equipment, people, or any item or area specifically designated by the Director before the round.” (803.01-B)[/learn_more]

#12 Fact or Fiction: If your disc is in a tree and is not retrievable you get penalized a stroke.

Fact & Fiction
If the disc is retrievable or not is not a factor here; whether the two meter rule is in play, and if your disc came to a rest above the two meters is the only factor.

#13 Fact or Fiction: If you tie with somebody on a hole, the order of play is changed, in favor of the player with no penalty throwing first.

Fiction
The only factor in determining order of play is the score. The order of play rules say nothing about factoring penalty strokes into the equation. (801.05)

#14 Fact or Fiction: A player must write his totals and initial on his or hers scorecard before turning it in.

Fact
“At the end of the round, each player shall sign the scorecard to attest to the accuracy of the score on each hole as well as (805.02.F) the total score.”

#15 Fact or Fiction: When within 10 meters of the basket you can fall to the side, but not towards the basket

Fact
This is demonstrated in the PDGA Rules School Video “Rules School – Demonstrating Balance – Putting”. Forward to the 1:40 mark which is example A-1.

#16 Fact or Fiction: Players must watch a fellow group member’s throw.

Unclear
“Players should watch the other members of their group throw in order to aid in locating errant throws and to ensure compliance with the rules” (801.04.B, emphasis added).

The language the PDGA uses is “players should…”, not must. The rules then go onto further explain that a player who refuses to help search for a lost disc would incur a courtesy violation (801.04.D). Therefore, if watching the flight of a disc, or watching the players performance to monitor any breaking of rules is expected of players, then a repeat courtesy violation offender may be justified penalty. While debatable, this rule seems to ultimately encourage players to be actively involved with their groups tournament play. If you are oblivious of others actions, it should incur you a penalty for repeat offenses. Will it? That may be up to the tournament director.

 

#17 Fact or Fiction: You incur a penalty for landing in the wrong basket.

False.
“Wrong Target. The player has holed out on a target that is not the target for the hole being played. If no subsequent throw has been made, play continues from the resulting lie.” (803.03.G.2).

Essentially, the player has been penalized enough by playing to the wrong basket. They then continue their play to the correct target, totaling all strokes taken to hole out at the correct hole.

If a player played to the wrong basket, and has then teed off for the next target, a two stroke penalty is incurred. It would seem most logical that a “Failure To Hole Out” penalty would apply (which adds three strokes of penalty), but the rules explicitly state that it is a two stroke penalty.

#18 Fact or Fiction: Discs which land on top of the target are considered in.

False.
This is one of the most discussed, and should not be debatable at this point; however, new players enter the sport daily, and many-a-player have seen discs come to rest atop the basket, so it is a worthy question.

“The disc and it must come to rest supported by the chains and/or the inner cylinder (bottom and inside wall) of the tray. It may be additionally supported by the pole.” (802.05.A)

#19 Fact or Fiction: A single blade of grass under your disc, qualifies it as in bounds.

False.
An object which is connected from in bounds, towards out of bounds, does not make everything under the object in bounds.

 

Disc Lights

Disc Golf Disc with Light

Throwing at night with LED disc golf lights attached to your discs is a fun and amazing experience. We sometimes joke that during these “night rounds” of disc golf, that the authorities will be called due to sightings of UFO’s in the area. There’s really nothing quite like it. So get your warm clothes out, and keep playing at night!

With an LED light attached to your disc in the dark, we find that it is easier to find your disc during the night than during the day. However, LED’s attached to your disc can have a few drawbacks. So we’ve put together some “best practices” to make your night round as enjoyable as possible.

Need some disc lights? We’ve got a few! Buy Disc Lights Here!

Disc Golf Light Best Practices:

1: Use plenty of quality tape

We actually use the same packaging tape which we send your orders out with to secure lights to the dis.. This is the Scotch packaging tape made by 3M, and it works perfectly. This is transparent tape. We have seen others use duct tape to secure the light to the disc; duct tape works very well, but will sometimes leave a sticky residue afterwards.

2: Apply tape to clean discs

If you have a dirt or oil on your disc, the tape will stick to that instead of the disc plastic. This will cause your light to fall of your disc when it comes in contact with another object. You can clean your disc off by rinsing and rubbing it, or you can actually clean it off with some dish soap like you’re doing the dishes. Do not use anything abrasive, unless you hate the stock stamp that came on your disc and you like scuffs. A gentle wash should clean your disc nicely.

3: Apply tape when it is warm

This is where advanced preparation is incredibly important. We suggest doing this a day in advance. If that is not realistic, at least a few hours in advanced. Take your discs inside and let them come to room temperature. Once warm, apply the tape (which should also be room temperature) to the disc golf lights and discs, and let the tape settle in and adhere for a couple hours.

4: Place Light Correctly, Use Transparent Discs

Some people will place the light on the top of the disc, or they’ll place it on the bottom with the light facing towards the ground. This is not the best way to place your light. The best way is to tape the light to the bottom of your disc, with the light shining through the plastic. This gives the light some additional protection, decreases drag above the disc, and gives you the most visibility.

5: Package the disc golf light in clear tape, prior to applying disc light to disc

This serves two purposes:

  1. It may waterproof the disc light.
  2. Prevents damage to the light when removing the light from the disc (you’ll thank us later!)

6: Two Lights is Better than One

Two lights flying look amazing, just like a UFO. We admit, we haven’t seen a UFO, but we’ve heard from others who have that this is what they look like. Also, two lights will decrease your chance of losing the disc, if one light comes lose.

If you do so, understand that these lights are 2.9 grams (roughly 3.1g if you have taped them over), and will affect flight. You will not have the truest flight to what you are use to with that disc. However, to keep flight consistent, place the lights on opposite ends.

7: Attach disc golf lights to targets or obstacles

It’s great that your disc is now visible, but unless you light up your target, you may be out of luck.

8: Buy from Infinite Discs

Our pricing is the best. The higher the quantity package you order, the better pricing that you will receive (on both shipping and cost per item). Our prices are so excellent that even larger stores purchase their lights from us at the 20 quantity pricing.

If you’re serious about disc golf after dark, you may also want to consider purchasing glow in the dark discs. Not all discs glow as well as others (most trilogy discs in terms of glow-ability, are almost worthless). These discs work best when you use a UV black light flashlight, and also worked great when a disc light is also attached to them for maximum visibility.

9: Not PDGA Approved (Somewhat True)

Every time we say something about playing in the night with disc lights, somebody will point out that lights are not PDGA approved. We use to think this was true, until Dan R. chimed in below:

Q: Are players allowed to tape LED lights on discs for night or winter play?

A glow stick or LED light may be attached/taped to any PDGA Approved disc for use in sanctioned events where play occurs after sunset in that time zone. In addition, these lights may be attached to PDGA Approved discs for use during sanctioned play in daylight, specifically when there is sufficient snow cover on the course where the lights might make discs easier to locate. Non-PDGA Approved discs such as those with built-in LED lights cannot be used at any time during sanctioned play.

So when the self-proclaimed PDGA police come out after sunset, you can grimly point them to PDGA FAQ.

10: If Playing at Night Public Parks, Inform Local Law Enforcement

Many public parks have a curfew, or will not allow citizens to be at them after dark. However, if you inform your local law enforcement in advance that you are organizing an event they will more-than-likely be happy to let you hold your event after dark.

11: Do not use flashlights or phones

Over time, your eyes will adjust to the dark. If you use a flashlight or whip out your phone to check Facebook, it will make finding your discs more difficult; especially if you have a buddy who is using glow discs. If you are going to use a bright light, give your fellow players a warning so they can shield their eyes. It’s much easier to see disc golf lights when your eyes are adjusted to the darkness.

Check out this article for more disc golf in the dark tips.

We want to know:

What is your favorite course to play in the dark (don’t forget to tell us which state!).
Are there any other “best practices which you would like to add?
How often do you disc golf at night through the cooler months?

PDGA Approved Discs: Release Rate

As disc golf becomes undeniably more popular, more discs enter the disc golf scene, vying for space in disc golfers bags. These facts about how many discs are being approved today, vs just 10 years ago may blow your mind.

PDGA Disc Approval Rate

1964 – 1987 Disc Approval Numbers

According to the list of PDGA approved discs (found here), the first approved disc was in 1964. That disc was named, according to the sheet “Professional” and was made by Wham-O / DTW. Twenty three years later, at the end of 1987 that number had grown to 71 approved discs.

Discs Approved Today

Fast forward to 2013. In 2013 alone, there were 73 PDGA approved discs, and as of October 15th, 2014 there are 70 PDGA approved discs in 2014. Since January 1, 2013 there have been 143 PDGA approved discs.
In all, there are 686 PDGA approved discs. Nearly 21% of approved discs in the market, have come within the last two years. This does not take into account the large number of discs which were once approved, but no longer in production. Were currently produced discs only taken into account, the percentage would be much higher.

Disc Approval Rate Per Year, by Decade

One final way to look at how disc production has changed, is to view the average number of discs approved per year, during a given decade.

1960’s:

    • .2 discs per year, or 1 disc every 5 years.

1970’s:

    • 1.6 discs per year.

1980’s:

    • 6.9 discs per year.

1990’s:

    • 10.6 discs per year.

2000’s:

    • 23.6 discs per year.

2010’s:

    (To Date):51.6 discs per year.

Disc Brand Increase

  • In the history of PDGA approved discs, 48 different brands have produced discs all time.
  • Within the last two years (after October 15, 2012) 27 of those 48 brands have produced a new approved disc.
  • 21 brands have not produced a new model within the last two years, either because they no longer manufacture, or they have not expanded their lineup.
  • Within the last two years, of the 27 that have made an approved disc, 14 of those brands had never created a disc previously. Over half of the brands creating new models today, did not exist before October 2012.

Brand status for the last 2 Years

New Brands:

  1. Axiom Discs
  2. Deity Discs
  3. DMI Sports
  4. Dynamic Discs
  5. Essential Discs
  6. Eurodisc
  7. HOLE19 sarl
  8. Kastaplast
  9. Obsidian Discs Oy
  10. Paradigm Disc Golf
  11. Prodigy Disc
  12. Salient Discs
  13. UB Disc Golf – Hand Candy
  14. Yikun Sports

Older than 2 years, with 1 or more new models

  1. CHING Sports
  2. Disc Golf Association
  3. Discmania
  4. Discraft
  5. Gateway Disc Sports
  6. Innova-Champion Discs
  7. Latitude 64
  8. Legacy Discs
  9. Millennium Golf Discs
  10. MVP Disc Sports
  11. Prodiscus
  12. Vibram Disc Golf
  13. Westside Golf Discs

No new models within 2 years

  1. 1080 Disc Golf
  2. ABC Discs
  3. Aerobie
  4. Crosslap Discgolf Parks
  5. Daredevil Discs
  6. Disc Golf Aotearoa
  7. Discwing
  8. DKG Disc Sports
  9. Dynamic/Destiny Discs
  10. Ferris State University
  11. Hero Leports Co., Ltd.
  12. Lightning Discs
  13. Pacific Cycle
  14. Plastic Paradise
  15. Quest Applied Technologies
  16. Rip Disc Golf
  17. Skyiron
  18. Skyquest
  19. Snap Discsports
  20. Wham-O / DTW/li>

Discs Approved Since October 15, 2012

Model

  1. Lace
  2. King VIP Air
  3. Stag
  4. Tursas
  5. Underworld
  6. Rival
  7. Zombee (Ace Race 2012)
  8. Amp
  9. Patriot
  10. Tern
  11. Escape
  12. Fugitive
  13. Judge
  14. Trespass
  15. Delivery
  16. Transition
  17. Transporter
  18. D1
  19. D2
  20. D3
  21. D4
  22. Shock
  23. 135G UltiPro Junior Ultimate
  24. 150G WaKa Freestyle Disc
  25. 175G UltiPro Ultimate
  26. View
  27. Assault
  28. Sabotage
  29. Vendetta
  30. P3 – Putt & Approach
  31. Proline Breaker
  32. Tangent
  33. Mace
  34. Laseri
  35. M1
  36. M2 (originally the M3)
  37. M3 (originally the M2)
  38. M4
  39. PA1
  40. PA2
  41. PA4
  42. Suspect
  43. Giant VIP Air
  44. Stag VIP Air
  45. Sword VIP Air
  46. Warship VIP Air
  47. MD3 – Midrange Driver
  48. Renegade
  49. Fury
  50. Tensor
  51. Mystic (retooled)
  52. Verdict
  53. Delivery Organic
  54. Transition Organic
  55. Transporter Organic
  56. Stiletto
  57. Truth
  58. Atlas
  59. Omega SuperSoft Big Bead
  60. O-Lace
  61. unLace
  62. F1
  63. F2
  64. F3
  65. F7
  66. Crank
  67. Rask
  68. Rage (retooled)
  69. Tank – Panzer
  70. D5
  71. Procul
  72. Nova
  73. Mortar
  74. Prometheus
  75. Resistor
  76. Bandit
  77. Gauge
  78. Mongoose
  79. Warden
  80. D5 (retooled)
  81. Saint Pro
  82. Foxbat
  83. Harp (Kannel1)
  84. Hatchet (Sotakipves1)
  85. Sorcerer (Tietäjä1)
  86. World (Maailma1)
  87. F5
  88. Yao
  89. Mantis (Ace Race 2013)
  90. Servo
  91. Antidote
  92. Jade
  93. Aries
  94. M5
  95. Alias
  96. Envy
  97. Rask (retooled)
  98. Tiger
  99. Inertia
  100. Switch
  101. Witness
  102. Daedalus
  103. Chimera
  104. Impulse
  105. Motion
  106. Tesla
  107. Outlaw
  108. Crave
  109. Claws
  110. Gui
  111. Wings
  112. Inspire
  113. Thief
  114. FD2
  115. Scythe
  116. Boatman VIP Air
  117. Shield
  118. Tursas VIP Air
  119. Underworld VIP Air
  120. Torrent
  121. PA3
  122. Four20
  123. Enforcer
  124. Claymore
  125. Dagger
  126. X1
  127. Monstrum
  128. Vein
  129. Lex
  130. Da’e
  131. Gou
  132. Hu
  133. Jun
  134. Assassin (retooled)
  135. Chief (retooled)
  136. Kaxe
  137. Missilen
  138. Backdraft
  139. Shaman
  140. Clash
  141. Supreme Legacy
  142. Felon
  143. Freedom
  144. Buzzz OS
  145. Bird-Dog
  146. Terrapin
  147. Touch
  148. Thunderbird
  149. Veteran
  150. Solace
  151. Honey
  152. H1
  153. Jiao
  154. Wei
  155. CD2
  156. Outlaw (retooled)
  157. Splinter
  158. Proxy
  159. Theory
  160. H2
  161. H4
  162. All in One

 

Manufacturer

Vibram Disc Golf
Westside Golf Discs
Westside Golf Discs
Westside Golf Discs
Westside Golf Discs
Legacy Discs
Discraft
MVP Disc Sports
Legacy Discs
Innova-Champion Discs
Dynamic Discs
Dynamic Discs
Dynamic Discs
Dynamic Discs
Eurodisc
Eurodisc
Eurodisc
Prodigy Disc
Prodigy Disc
Prodigy Disc
Prodigy Disc
MVP Disc Sports
Yikun Sports
Yikun Sports
Yikun Sports
Yikun Sports
DMI Sports
DMI Sports
DMI Sports
Discmania
Disc Golf Association
MVP Disc Sports
Latitude 64
Prodiscus
Prodigy Disc
Prodigy Disc
Prodigy Disc
Prodigy Disc
Prodigy Disc
Prodigy Disc
Prodigy Disc
Dynamic Discs
Westside Golf Discs
Westside Golf Discs
Westside Golf Discs
Westside Golf Discs
Discmania
Dynamic Discs
Latitude 64
MVP Disc Sports
Gateway Disc Sports
Dynamic Discs
Eurodisc
Eurodisc
Eurodisc
Latitude 64
Dynamic Discs
Innova-Champion Discs
Millennium Golf Discs
Vibram Disc Golf
Vibram Disc Golf
Prodigy Disc
Prodigy Disc
Prodigy Disc
Prodigy Disc
Discraft
Kastaplast
Gateway Disc Sports
Millennium Golf Discs
Prodigy Disc
UB Disc Golf – Hand Candy
Innova-Champion Discs
Millennium Golf Discs
Salient Discs
MVP Disc Sports
Legacy Discs
Legacy Discs
Legacy Discs
Dynamic Discs
Prodigy Disc
Latitude 64
Innova-Champion Discs
Westside Golf Discs
Westside Golf Discs
Westside Golf Discs
Westside Golf Discs
Prodigy Disc
Yikun Sports
Discraft
MVP Disc Sports
Salient Discs
Latitude 64
Millennium Golf Discs
Prodigy Disc
Axiom Discs
Axiom Discs
Kastaplast
Paradigm Disc Golf
MVP Disc Sports
MVP Disc Sports
Dynamic Discs
Innova-Champion Discs
Deity Discs
MVP Disc Sports
MVP Disc Sports
MVP Disc Sports
Legacy Discs
Axiom Discs
Yikun Sports
Yikun Sports
Yikun Sports
Axiom Discs
Dynamic Discs
Discmania
Latitude 64
Westside Golf Discs
Westside Golf Discs
Westside Golf Discs
Westside Golf Discs
Disc Golf Association
Prodigy Disc
Vibram Disc Golf
Dynamic Discs
Latitude 64
Latitude 64
Prodigy Disc
UB Disc Golf – Hand Candy
Salient Discs
UB Disc Golf – Hand Candy
Yikun Sports
Yikun Sports
Yikun Sports
Yikun Sports
Gateway Disc Sports
Gateway Disc Sports
Kastaplast
Latitude 64
Salient Discs
Gateway Disc Sports
Axiom Discs
CHING Sports
Dynamic Discs
Dynamic Discs
Discraft
Paradigm Disc Golf
Paradigm Disc Golf
Salient Discs
Innova-Champion Discs
Millennium Golf Discs
Vibram Disc Golf
Essential Discs
Prodigy Disc
Yikun Sports
Yikun Sports
Discmania
Legacy Discs
Obsidian Discs Oy
Axiom Discs
Axiom Discs
Prodigy Disc
Prodigy Disc

Date Approved

10/30/12
10/30/12
10/30/12
10/30/12
10/30/12
11/02/12
11/13/12
11/14/12
11/28/12
12/03/12
12/07/12
12/07/12
12/07/12
12/07/12
12/11/12
12/11/12
12/11/12
01/01/13
01/01/13
01/01/13
01/01/13
01/15/13
01/16/13
01/16/13
01/16/13
01/16/13
02/08/13
02/08/13
02/08/13
02/13/13
02/22/13
02/22/13
03/04/13
03/04/13
03/05/13
03/05/13
03/05/13
03/05/13
03/05/13
03/05/13
03/05/13
03/10/13
03/10/13
03/10/13
03/10/13
03/10/13
03/29/13
04/04/13
04/19/13
04/19/13
05/14/13
05/30/13
05/30/13
05/30/13
05/30/13
05/30/13
06/18/13
06/18/13
06/22/13
06/25/13
06/25/13
07/06/13
07/06/13
07/06/13
07/06/13
07/08/13
07/18/13
08/29/13
08/29/13
08/29/13
08/29/13
09/03/13
09/03/13
09/03/13
09/23/13
09/25/13
09/25/13
09/25/13
10/14/13
10/14/13
10/17/13
10/22/13
10/28/13
10/28/13
10/28/13
10/28/13
11/01/13
11/01/13
12/01/13
12/01/13
12/16/13
12/20/13
01/06/14
01/06/14
01/12/14
01/12/14
01/12/14
01/19/14
02/10/14
02/10/14
02/17/14
02/17/14
02/22/14
02/22/14
02/22/14
02/22/14
02/25/14
03/09/14
03/09/14
03/09/14
03/09/14
03/22/14
03/22/14
03/24/14
03/24/14
03/24/14
03/24/14
03/24/14
03/24/14
03/25/14
03/25/14
03/31/14
04/07/14
04/13/14
04/13/14
05/04/14
05/04/14
05/13/14
05/13/14
05/13/14
05/13/14
05/13/14
05/13/14
05/19/14
05/19/14
05/19/14
05/22/14
05/22/14
06/09/14
06/10/14
07/14/14
07/14/14
07/14/14
07/19/14
07/19/14
07/19/14
07/20/14
08/05/14
08/05/14
08/05/14
08/26/14
08/26/14
08/26/14
08/26/14
09/05/14
09/17/14
09/17/14
09/24/14
09/24/14
09/26/14
09/26/14
10/01/14

We’re curious what you think. Comment below and let us know your thoughts on any or all of the following:

  • With this many new models and new brands, is it good for the sport?
  • History shows us that not all of the molds being produced today will remain in production. Will discs be moved to “out of production” more quickly, because more discs have entered the market? Or is there room enough for all of the new molds being released, especially when considering industry growth in general?
  • Do you like the additional selection, or do you wish we were back to the days of ?
  • How much of your bag is comprised of these new molds?
  • From the brands which are older than two years, and have not produced any new discs, do you own or use any of their discs? If so, which discs?

 

Infinite Bags

Introducing the Infinite Bags

Over the course of the last year we have been quietly working on our own version of bags for disc golfers. Our goal throughout the process was to create a bag that exceeds similarly sized bags in both quality and affordability. We feel that we have accomplished that with both the Infinite Small Bag and the Infinite Large Bag.

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Launch Promotion – Limited Time Only

During the entire month of October, we are offering this bag at an excellent introductory price.

  • Small Bag Value: $19.99. On sale for $13.99

  • Large Bag Value: $49.99. On sale for $39.99

  • Straps Value: $23.99. On sale for $19.99

  • Large Bag w/ Straps Value: $74.99. On sale for $49.99

  • * Offer Ends 10/31/2014

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    Bag Features


    Small Infinite Bag – Shop Here
    Regular Price: $19.99

    1. Holds 8-10 discs
    2. 1680 denier nylon (The most durable)
    3. High quality zippers
    4. Pocket for putters
    5. Drink holder with drawstring
    6. Embroidered Infinite Discs logo
    7. Padded bottom with rigid plastic
    8. Single divider so discs stay better organized
    9. Shoulder strap with rubber shoulder pad
    10. Available in: Red, Blue, Black or Orange

    Large Infinite Bag – Shop Here
    Regular Price: $49.99

    1. Holds 18 – 22 Discs
    2. 1680 Denier Nylon (The most durable)
    3. YKK Zippers
    4. Strong elastic putter pocket holds 1 or 2 putters
    5. 2 large strong elastic bottle holders
    6. Embroidered Infinite Discs logo
    7. Large storage pockets on both sides
    8. Two removable dividers to keep discs organized
    9. Scorecard and/or phone sleeve
    10. Mini pocket
    11. Small accessory pocket
    12. 3 small pencil holders
    13. 1 large pencil holder
    14. 4 plastic pegs which prevent rollovers and keep bag slightly elevated
    15. Shoulder strap with fabric shoulder pad.
    16. Compatible with all major backpack style bag straps.
    17. Available in: Red, Blue, Black, Orange or Burgundy

    Infinite Straps – Shop Here
    Regular Price: $23.99

    1. Compatible with all major large bag designs
    2. Chest clip to more evenly disperse weight load
    3. Spring loaded metal clips
    4. Embroidered Infinite Discs logo
    5. Available in black only

    Addressing Previous Bag Issues

    Fabric Durability
    We had two options to fix concerns with fabric. Stop using fabric, or use better fabric. To keep the bag affordable, fabric is the answer. To make it more durable we found 1680D Nylon; the most durable nylon fabric available in textile manufacturing. When you touch the fabric you can feel the density of this durable material which is more and made of dense strands of nylon which are more resistant to shredding or tearing. This is the most resilient fabric to adverse conditions.

    Zipper Durability
    Zippers frequently come off their tracks, or the pull tab completely breaks off of the zipper; requiring you to improvise with a paper clip or just never zip your bag again. To remedy this, we went with YKK zippers. In case you are unfamiliar with zippers, YKK is the most trusted brand of zippers in the world. All metal, and smooth sliding, you should be pleased with your YKK zipper.

    Straps tearing out of seams
    Seams in other bags separate easily. We have strong stitching on all seems; especially on seems where straps are attached. That way if your bag

    Having addressed all of these issues, we hope that your Infinite Large Bag or Infinite Small Bag treat you well for years to come. Will your bag have issues eventually? We hope not, but unfortunately everything comes in need of repair; with an Infinite Discs bag, chances are that your time between replacement bags will be drastically reduced.

    Our Promise

    We feel confident that we have created a very quality bag made of durable material. If you experience any issues with the workmanship listed above within the first three months, contact us and we’ll gladly help you. Please view our Return & Exchange Policy.

    Free Infinite Discs Towel

    [box type=”shadow”]Free Disc Golf Towel!

    Do you want a free Infinite Discs Golf Towel?

    – Ultra Absorbent

    – Micro Fiber

    – Waffle Weave

    – Durable

    – Black

    Of course you do.

    The Infinite Discs 2.0 website is nearing an official launch! For the new site to provide everything disc golfers want, we need YOU to update your Infinite Discs Reviewer Profile.[/box]


    Complete these 4 Steps to get your free towel promo code.

    1. Log in to your Infinite Discs account

    ForgotPasswordIf you have written reviews on Infinite Discs before, you should already have an account under the email address used when you submitted your review. You don’t know your password because the old system didn’t have passwords.

    To reset your password go to our beta test 2.0 website at https://infinitediscs.com/login

    Then select “forgot password” with the email address you previously reviewed with. You will be emailed a new password.

    If you have never reviewed discs on InfiniteDiscs.com before, then simply register for a new account.


    2. Update Your Reviewer Profile (Including your profile picture and a new password you can remember).

    updateprofile


    3. Edit Your Reviews Including Both Star Ratings and Plastic Type

    Our old system did not tie the ratings to the review so the listed star rating is probably not how you would rate the disc.

    EditReviewsIf you’ve have YouTube footage with a video review of your disc, you can actually upload a video review here too using the film strip icon.

    ***Note, when you update your review make sure you update your star rating. The default star rating is set as 1. So if you don’t click the star amount you want to give, you will probably be rating the disc lower than you mean to.
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    Discs should be rated according to the following criteria:

  • 1 Star – Waste of Plastic. Not Recommended for Anyone
  • 2 Star – Below Average
  • 3 Star – Average Disc
  • 4 Star – Good Disc, Above Average
  • 5 Star – Must Have
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    If you haven’t written any reviews, now is the time to do so. Simply create an Infinite Discs user profile, rate and review five products you’ve used, and you to are eligible for a free towel.


    4. Complete This Form

    Once you have completed all these steps, simply complete the form below, we will review your profile and email you your promo code for your free towel.

    Everyone who updates their reviewer profiles by Oct 31st, 2014 will be eligible to receive a free Infinite Discs towel.

    To redeem your free towel promo code, simply add the towel to checkout on the beta site when you place your next order. Enter the promo code under “discounts” and it will make the cost of the towel $0. You will still be responsible for paying the shipping. Only one free towel per reviewer. If you want more than one Infinite Discs towel, you will need to purchase additional towels using a separate transaction without the promo code.

    Infinite Discs Reviews YouTube Channel

    InfiniteDiscs.com is well known for the many in depth disc reviews our website offers. While reading reviews is a great way to get the information you’re looking for about a certain disc — videos of discs in flight are even better. We have some friends in Ohio who have started an awesome YouTube review channel for us. They are already at it reviewing some of the hottest discs currently on the market. This new channel will provide loads of good information, and opportunities to win free disc golf stuff that you will only know about by subscribing to the channel.

    Check out the video reviews that have already been uploaded, and subscribe to this new channel right now.

    MVP Motion Review

    Latitude 64 Scythe Review

    Tournament Payout Depth

    After the Maple Hill Open last week, Paul McBeth posted on Facebook about the depth of tournament payouts. He stated that he felt that a player who performed far worse received compensation far above what it should have been, especially when compared to the scores of those who competed at a higher level. I can’t recall the words exactly, it looks as though the post has since been removed.

    In other words, those who placed near the top took less because the payout was spread across a broad number of people. Paul was both negatively blasted and praised for his comments.

    What is “Payout Depth”

    The payout depth is the percentage of competitors who receive a payout. You can view the PDGA “Pro Payout Table” here. Clicking the link will prompt you to download a .xls file. With this scale, the top 45% receive a payout. The last 20 paid receive 37% of the payout.

    When looking at the issue, the comments boiled down to two issues with payouts:

    Should Tournament Payouts Promote Champions or Promote More Participation?

    The argument is that when a regular champion receive more, others are less inclined to take part in the sport. I think that assumption is false.

    Disc Golf Needs a Champion. Why Tiger Woods was Good for Golf

    I once lived in Denver, where Sports Authority is headquartered, and became friends with one of the Chief Executives. He and I were lounging on a Sunday watching “ball golf”, and Tiger Woods was on the brink of losing his 5 stroke lead in the final round. With only a 1 stroke difference between him and Woody Allen and two holes left to play, what was once a leisure game of golf became intense. This executive was depending on Tiger Woods to come out victorious. I inquired why, and he said that when there is a champion which people can cheer for, the sport thrives and sales increase. In the end, Tiger was victorious, much to the relief of my executive friend.

    I share that story to kick this post off, because disc golf needs a Tiger Woods. Yes, for sales. Money coming into disc golf is a good thing for places like Infinite Discs; I’m not going to hide that. So if you feel I’m bias, that’s why.

    But it’s more than just dollars and cents. Champions are good for the competition, the passion, the structure, and most importantly, the fanaticism. It’s what we love in sports and what keeps us coming back – champions being challenged by underdogs, champions thriving, champions being disparaged by competitors fans, dynasties, and dynasties falling to a new one. This is what enthralls us in a sport and keeps us coming back for more.

    Why Compete in a Disc Golf Tournament?

    When players arrive at a tournament they want to have fun, they want to compete, they want to feel the pressure of being at the top, and they want to win. I don’t know anyone who entered a tournament who had already mentally visioned and accepted their fate of taking last place. That player would not show up on competition day. Players dream of and talk about standing atop the winners podium.

    Nearly every player outside of the touring professionals are underdogs; and that’s understood. In Utah we have the Mello Yello Challenge at the Solitude Disc Golf Course. When Paul McBeth arrives in August to compete after Worlds, each player in his division will be aiming to be on the lead card with him at the end, and then to win at the final round. Who wouldn’t want to play with and score better than the top rated player in the world!? Just to amaze yourself.

    Then you would realize you’re taking home a giant check, too.

    When all is said and done, many players scores will fall far outside of those in the winners circle. Most of the players will not be paid. Will they be disappointed and vow never to return to a disc golf tournament? Probably not. If they vow never to return, they probably had more issues than just their score with that tournament. Disc golfers are generally easy-going, happy to participate and compete, own-my-own-results type of people. Will they be a bit bummed that they didn’t play better? Usually they are. If every competitor expected to receive payouts for mediocre or horrible performance, that would be a culture issue that needed to be addressed. Competition is not about making everyone a winner, it’s about rewarding excellence.

    Many ‘losers’ will go home with stories about amazing shots, flashes of brilliance, and eagerness to improve and compete at a higher level next year – maybe even get into the money… real money, not consolation money as a result of paying a deep field, that wouldn’t even cover gas.

    By removing payout for those in the middle of the pack and bumping that up to the winners, nobody will be offended. Winners will be properly rewarded, and more inclined to focus on winning and dedicating further efforts to growing the sport (and therefore increasing their competition field… and therefore increasing their future payouts). Those who don’t win will work harder to improve as well.

    Players Competing For Money Are Greedy

    This is one of the reasons why the NBA and I get along less and less. Paul was blasted in his post for wanting more money, with critics saying that he just needs to learn to enjoy the ride. Here’s the reality of most top touring pros right now, including Paul – they’re not that wealthy. These pros stay in the most affordable accommodations available. Prior to competitions,  some ask for floor space to sleep on to save a few extra bucks. So yes, money can corrupt the love and passion in the sport… but touring pros are driven by the survival instinct right now. A little extra money to set aside for a home and hotel accommodations while touring is not greedy.

    What about “sandbagging?”

    We all know the players I’m talking about, the ones who are clearly more advanced than the division in which they are competing. I know some individuals who play intermediate regularly, even though they may take 3rd overall in the tournament. Ironically, if those individuals would have played up another division they would have won more, as the payouts in the more advanced divisions pay fewer people. In this blog post, I am not arguing for modifying amateur and lower division payouts. Continue to keep those payouts flat. In those divisions, reward participation. Keep the top division payouts aggressive, steep, and reward excellence. This, too, encourages players to improve so they can get better payouts.

    Players Need to Get Sponsors Instead of Complaining About Low Payouts

    Many of the comments blamed players for low payouts and their failure to obtain sponsorships. As one of the owners of a rapidly growing disc golf brand, I would love to reach into my pockets and sponsor more players… But, I don’t want to offend anybody, there are a few reality checks to visit:

    Reality #1: Disc golf is small (even though it is growing).
    Reality #2: Disc golf is not very profitable (yet).

    For a sponsor, it’s all about ROI (Return on Investment). A smart sponsor will reach their target audience by sponsoring (which would be disc golf companies like Infinite Discs). Disc golf companies are strapped for cash due to high competition in a relatively small market, and other sponsors hesitate because they want to connect with their target audience and get decent return as well. However, there is no single great way to reach all disc golfers and get a solid ROI. For that reason, the obtaining of sponsors cannot be put squarely on the players shoulders – it actually needs to be put on all disc golfers shoulders.

    How? Disc golf will continue to grow steadily throughout the United States and the world. Disc golfers need to respect their courses, respect others, and to invite others out to play. At Infinite Discs we try to encourage others to grow the sport through giveaways such as this: #growthesport campaign.

    On another post I’ll focus on great ways to grow the sport, as well as the best ways to get more courses in your area. Some people have a difficult time with wanting to grow the sport, as it will become more “main stream.” Obviously, I don’t have a problem with that, it helps feed my family and hopefully I’ll be able to save something for a rainy day. I also like to see the sport grow because it’s a fantastic recreational activity for all ages. It pulls people out doors, it brings us to beautiful places in which we live, and it’s a cost-effective answer to recreation for cities. Nothing wrong with having more courses to play within a short driving distance!

    Let me know what your thoughts are on the article above and what you’d like to see more of! Here’s to next time!

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