New Disc Golf Accessories- Wild Discs

Wild Discs is a new disc golf brand as of this past year. They’ve introduced a handful of new discs to the market as well as some of their own branded disc golf accessories. They are a new brand that takes on some social responsibility. For every item sold of theirs, they are contributing a portion of their sales to a wildlife conservation organization. Whether you are throwing their plastic, or using their gear. You are helping them to contribute and preserve this planet that we live on.

At Infinite Discs, we have added a few more disc golf accessories from Wild Discs. We now carry their microfiber waffle towel, and their grip sack. Providing you another way to get some disc golf gear and support wildlife conservation.

Wild Discs Grip Sack

The Wild Discs Grip Sack will remove moisture from your hands easily in any weather condition. With its clay based filler this will remove moisture from you hands. It will also limit the the amount of powder that will escape the grip bag. This bag will keep your bag clean, and provide better grip on your discs.

This grip sack is only $8.99 and available for purchase at InfiniteDiscs.com. Just look for it under Accessories – Grip Enhancers

 

Wild Discs Microfiber Waffle Towel

This Wild Discs Microfiber Waffle Towel is a polyester and polyamide blended towel designed to clean dirt, dust, and dry the disc. Build to last with durable and thick material that will keep your discs or hands clean while out on the course. Easy to attach to your bag with a grommet and clip.

This towel is available for purchase on InfiniteDiscs.com under the “Towels” section. You can buy it for $15.99.

Team Infinite Player Spotlight: Taylor Aubuchon

When I started my journey down the rabbit hole of learning about disc golf and buying discs about 2 years ago, Taylor Aubuchon was the first reviewer I came across. I appreciated Taylor’s succinct reviews that had no extra fluff in them: 60-second reviews, a couple throws from different release angles, flight trackers, and good descriptions of the feel and flight of a specific disc.



The more knowledge I gain, or think I gain, I still find myself looking forward to and immediately clicking on any new videos from Taylor. Taylor can pack just the right amount of information into a short and easily digestible video. Most of Taylor’s videos also end with a discount code to be used at infinitediscs.com

I reached out for a brief interview to better introduce Taylor to other Infinite followers that may not be aware of his content, social media presence, and mission to grow the game.

 

What is your disc golf origin story?

In late middle school/early high school (2007/2008), my group of friends and I were introduced to the game through our church’s youth group. I also took my dad and brother out to play and we were all hooked instantly. We were really lucky to have a great course just a few minutes away and started to play relatively seriously early on. Our youth group started a weekly bag tag series, and I even started to run a small doubles charity tournament within that first year.

How long have you been working with Infinite Discs?

Fortunately for me, Infinite started to support me after just my first review video, which was in March 2019. I’ll never be able to thank Dylan enough for believing in the plan I had for a different take on review videos! It’s pretty crazy to see how far I’ve come and how much it’s grown since then.

When did you start posting disc golf videos?

I started posting in March 2019, right when the first run I-Blend Emperors came out. This was a disc I was really excited about and thought it needed some more light shed on it. It was a mediocre video, to say the least, but it got some great feedback and I’ve been trying to improve and refine my style ever since.

How did you develop your signature and succinct review style?

I think as most content creators develop their style it starts out being mostly self-serving. After taking an extended hiatus from the game, my brother introduced me to the Infinite brand. I was hard-pressed to find any reviews or really any content focused on their lineup. Most YouTube reviews I was watching seemed quite long for their purpose, and I couldn’t find any review content on Instagram at the time. I saw an opportunity to create a more concise format that would be able to be pushed to the more underutilized avenues of social media. The original plan was actually to only post them to Instagram. I only created a YouTube channel to be able to share the reviews in Infinite’s comment section.

What disc surprised you the most after reviewing it? (You weren’t expecting to like, flew differently than expected, etc)

Definitely the Aztec. I had never really thrown that kind of straight control driver that still had good distance potential. When the I-Blend test run came out I loved the feel and flight it had, but it beat in just a little too quickly to be super reliable. Thankfully, the color glow run came out shortly after and I’ve had at least two in my bag ever since. The Aztec gives me the control of the Exodus, while not sacrificing much of the extra distance I’d get from bumping up to an Emperor of Pharaoh. If they’re ever looking for a name to put on the color glow Aztec, I know a guy that’d be pretty interested.

What is your favorite Infinite disc?

The Tomb without a doubt. I power grip everything but putts, so the Tomb is a perfect throwing putter for me with its shallow rim. Right now I’m bagging a Splatter S-Blend for overstable, C-Blend for stable, and D-Blend for understable throwing putter slots.

Check out Taylor’s Tomb review here:

Infinite Discs D-Blend Tomb Review

What is your favorite non-infinite disc?

I’ve had a full infinite bag for a bit over a year now, but the hardest disc for me to take out was the Westside Discs Pine. I enjoy a taller, more overstable feeling Midrange that beat into straight fliers. Taking the time to beat a disc into that perfect spot gives you a level of confidence and trust in it that can’t easily be replaced.

Who is your player on tour?

I always look forward to watching Drew Gibson shred out there. Best backhand form on tour!

Do you compete in tournaments? Discuss some local events, results, experiences, etc.

Unfortunately, it’s been a couple of years since I’ve played a local event, but I’m hoping to get back out there soon! 

What are some of your disc golf goals?

Since really diving into content creation, most of my goals center around growing my presence to be able to share these awesome discs with as many people as possible! It’d be awesome to hit 1000 YouTube subscribers someday, but I try not to focus too hard on any specific avenue as there are so many outlets to push to. As far as disc golf specific, I’m always tweaking something in my game. Right now the goal is to develop a more consistent forehand, there’s a reason you’ve never seen me throw a forehand in any video…

Check out Taylor’s full video catalog here:

Taylor Aubuchon – YouTube

What are some of your hobbies outside of and other than disc golf?

Before disc golf, my biggest passions were music and video games. I played in local bands throughout high school and dove pretty deep into music production afterward. I’ve also streamed via Twitch off and on since around 2015. Although music has taken a bit of a back seat recently, I still stream regularly at twitch.tv/ursapls and would love to talk disc golf, gaming, or music with anyone that wants to stop by!

 

 

Be sure to Subscribe to Taylor’s YouTube channel and Follow him on Instagram(tayloraubuchon)!

We will be continuing this series, spotlighting members of Team Infinite from all 4 levels: Signature, Elite, Ambassador, and Core Teams. Please share this article and comment below which player(s) that you would like to hear from!

 

Get outside and throw some discs. Have an awesome day! 

Morgan Leonard

Molenny Disc Golf

Drew Gibson Apparel

Infinite Discs is now carrying more disc golf apparel. This apparel is unique as a portion of these proceeds will go to Drew Gibson. These proceeds will continue to help Drew tour as has been, the same concept as the tour discs. There are a variety of clothing items that sport his various logos, all to ensure that you can find a style or apparel that suits you. Whether for playing or for lounging, there is somethings for you.

We have a section within the apparel menu that is dedicated to these items. You can find all of Drew’s clothing under “Drew Gibson Apparel“.

Hats

There are a variety of caps available. Whether you need a cold weather beanie, a stylish flat brim, a comfortable floppy dad hat, or a good baseball cap; you’ll be able to find a hat that suits your needs.

Shirts

Drew provides a wide selection of shirts. There are short and long sleeved shirts. They are all cotton based shirts ensuring a good comfortable fit. Be sure to check these shirts out.

Shorts

The Evo Tie Dye Shorts is a sweat type short that is meant to be comfortable. Its tie die offers a stylish look as well. These shorts also offer a back pocket and hand pockets. You may place a pre-order for these now for $35.00.

  • 9 oz., 80/20 cotton/polyester blend
  • Relaxed fit with tapered knee opening
  • 100% cotton 30 singles face yarn
  • Elastic waistband with flat drawcord
  • Sewn eyelets
  • Sewn fly detail
  • Back pocket & jersey lined hand pockets
  • Woven label
  • Due to the nature of tie dye, loose pigments may remain on the surface of the garments. We therefore strongly recommend washing these garments only with like-colored garments, as some of the tie dyes may stain light or white colored garments in the wash cycle. Washing the garments in cold water will reduce the possibility of staining.

Hoodies

There are a handful hoodies, some lightweight and others a little bit thicker. There is a variety of colors, and different styled logos.

 

All preorder items have a tentative shipping date of sometime in the month of June.

A Look At New Disc Golfers

New Disc Golfer on Mountainous Course

2021 State of Disc Golf

New Disc Golfers

As has been pointed out in numerous blogs, podcasts, YouTube videos, and even this blog series, the pandemic has created a boon for the sport of disc golf. A perfect storm of having more time on our hands, the need to socially distance from people, in many cases a bump in income from the federal government, and a sport that is relatively inexpensive and easy to get into has led to unprecedented growth for disc golf. That growth has not been without its pains. Shutdowns, materials shortages, and the increase in demand have led to challenges in maintaining inventory.

Even with the difficulties we are experiencing, and have experienced, it is great to see so many new people embracing the sport we love. Those new players are going to be the focus of this blog. We’ll take another look at how many survey respondents indicated that they started playing last year. Then we’ll look at why they started, how many discs they’ve amassed, and we’ll take a peek inside their bag to see what they are throwing. Finally, we’ll also compare their responses to the ‘veteran’ disc golfers to see what we can learn about them and us.

New To The Sport

Let’s start by seeing when people indicated in the survey that they started playing. In a previous State of Disc Golf 2021 blog we learned that nearly 20% of respondents started playing last year. Here are those results:

 

Let’s take a look at a few previous years’ survey results to see how the pandemic might have affected the results of the same question (as if we really wonder how it was affected!) Here are the results from two previous years. The chart shows the survey year, and the percent of people who started playing disc golf the previous year:

2015 9.70%
2019 10.20%
2021 19.20%

Given that extraordinary increase in the number of people who joined the PDGA last year, the 19% figure could have been a lot higher and it wouldn’t have surprised me. Still, one in five of all survey respondents starting last year isn’t too shabby.

Introduced To Disc Golf

The follow-up question in the survey was for people who indicated that they started last year, and that question was, “How did you get into disc golf?” I discovered in writing this blog that the spreadsheet format excluded some of the answers in the previous blog, so I ran the data again and here are the accurate numbers for that question:

 

 

Just like last time, the number one reason people started playing disc golf was because of a friend. What better way to share the sport than inviting a friend? Close to half of all respondents who started last year were looking for something to do during the pandemic. Over 28% wanted some way to get exercise, while 22% just stumbled onto the sport. Even though the smallest number of respondents found disc golf from seeing it on a sports program, I like the idea that people are intrigued enough from watching disc golf to give it a try.

In Their Bag

Alright, let’s take a look at what the new disc golfers are throwing. Because of the disc shortages experienced last year, I expected the discs in the bags of the new golfers to look like Infinite’s inventory: full of whatever we could get our hands on. It turns out that the typical new-person bag looks very similar to what everyone else’s bag looks like, statistically speaking. Here is the graph of the average bag, followed by the graph for the discs in the average new player’s bag.

 

 

For comparison, below is a chart from last year’s survey showing what discs were in our bags. As you can see, the numbers are similar to the ones in the graphs above. That is both the percentage and the overall ranking of the top brands.

Although there are some differences with the new player’s numbers, most of them are pretty close to the group numbers. Many of the statistics are driven by available supply. However, taking a look at last year’s chart for the same category, we can see that they numbers aren’t too far away from what we’ve seen in the past. It will be interesting to see what changes take place in the future, based on what people had in their bags last year. How many people ended up trying new disc brands because that was all that was available? And will they stick with brands they were forced to try?

Give The Gift Of Disc

I was curious to see where new players got their discs, and how many got them from their friends who invited them to play. That would help explain why the charts look similar. According to the survey, 45% of players who started playing last year received, among other sources, a disc as a gift. We didn’t differentiate in the survey between discs that were given by another player versus discs that were received as a present for Christmas, birthdays, etc. Getting a disc from another player might mean they are receiving brands that the friend throws.

One other survey question I want to explore will tell us a little bit about how hooked the new players are on disc golf. We asked how many discs people own. Here is a graph of everybody’s answers:

 

And here is a graph of the players who started playing last year. Although the new players have the lead compared to seasoned golfers up to the 31-40 discs category, after that the long timers take over as the leader. That makes sense because we have a tendency to increase our disc golf collection over time, whether we are keeping discs we don’t throw, have more wall hangers, or start to collect discs. Here is the graph:

In The Future

It will be interesting to see how the influx of new players affects the sport in the long run. Growth is good and hopefully will compound in the near future. We REALLY hope the supply/demand dynamic will flatten out soon so we can escape the hoarder mentality and be able to buy what we want when we want it.

Check back next week for more of the 2021 State of Disc Golf.

What Disc Golf Accessories Do We Own

 

2021 State of Disc Golf

 

What Accessories Do We Own

 

One of the benefits of our sport is that it is relatively inexpensive to get started. A beginner who wants to play casually can get a few base-plastic discs and find a course that is free to play. For $20, you could be set for the summer. Even if you opt for premium plastics and a small bag, you could keep your expenses under $50. Compared to ball golf or many other sports, that is a bargain! Plus, that easy entry into the sport contributes to its growth. Even if you are buying discs for the whole family, it’s still a cheap hobby.

Once we’ve been playing for very long at all, we start considering some of the other disc golf related items we could use when we play. A mini is a necessity if you play tournaments and even leagues. Towels are nice in case our discs or our hands get damp. Maybe a bigger bag? Or how about jumping up to a cart? While disc golf CAN be played inexpensively, one can also spend a lot of money upgrading to the best discs, bags, and many varieties of accessories and apparel. For the 2021 State of Disc Golf survey, we wanted to see what disc golf paraphernalia was the most popular. We asked about accessories, apparel, water bottles, and what we use to haul our gear around. Let’s take a look at what items were the most popular.

Accessories

 

In the survey, we listed popular accessories and asked how many of them we own. Not too surprising that the number one answer was a plastic mini. Number seven is a premium mini (made out of wood, glass, etc.). Although there were a lot of people who indicated that they own both a plastic and a premium mini. The bottom line is that nearly all of us have a mini of one kind or another. If you play in a sanctioned event, you really NEED a mini. That need, along with the fact that the regularly show up in player’s packs, makes it easy to see why the mini is number one. Here are the results:

 

 

When I consider what accessories I own, and what I see my buddies use, most of these numbers look right. There is one that looks glaringly wrong: the ubiquitous water bottle. Less than half of us own a water bottle? It wouldn’t have surprised me if the water bottle were the number one accessory. I know a few golfers that use bladders, similar to the CamelBak. But that doesn’t account for what I consider to be a lot smaller percentage of people who indicate they don’t own a water bottle, than what I see on the course.

More Accessories

 

Towels and grip enhancers are two more items that I see enough on the disc golf course that it is not surprising to see them at the top of the list. Rounding out the list is an item that we’ve been see a lot more advertising for in the past few years: the rangefinder. I see a lot more of these in use than even a year ago. With less expensive options like the Apex Rangefinder, it is easier to justify getting one.

 

Water Bottles

 

Speaking of water bottles, we also asked in the survey what kind of water bottles. Jesse from Trash Panda Disc Golf will be happy to hear that over 80% of us prefer reusable water bottles. (To see what Jesse is doing for sustainable disc golf, check out our blog post featuring Jesse here). Like so many of us have discovered, the double-wall insulated water bottles are the most effective at keeping your beverages cold. Pro tip: you CAN put too much ice in these types of water bottles and end up with nothing but ice after you drink all the liquid. That’s a bummer on a hot day. Experiment with the level of ice to see what works best for your water bottle. Here are the results:

 

 

Apparel

 

Whether you are talking about a sports team, shoe company, favorite band, or YouTube celebrity, many of us like to show our loyalty by wearing apparel from the companies, individual, or groups that we support. It’s no different with disc golfers, so we asked in the survey what branded apparel we own? I would have thought that tee shirts and hats would have been at the top of the list, but I would have bet on hats being the number one choice. Here are the results:

 

 

In addition to tee shirts and hats, rounding out the top five are hoodies, polo shirts, and beanies. Personally, I have everything on the list but a branded jacket, shorts, and pants. The percentages listed in the results represent 2/3 of us. Slightly over 33% of us indicated that we don’t own branded apparel of any kind on the list. That’s surprising, given how frequently these items show up in player’s packs.

 

Hauling Discs Around

 

The final category we’ll look at today is how we carry our discs. We let people choose all that apply to them, so the percentages add up to more than 100%. Taking the top spot is the popular backpack bag. We don’t have to play disc golf for long before we have enough discs and accessories to justify getting a backpack bag. They are great for casual rounds and multi-day tournaments. Some golfers even get a cart that can hold their backpack bag, to use on cart-friendly courses. Over 77% of us have a backpack bag. That’s more than three times the second most popular choice, the small bag with a single strap. Here are all of the results:

 

Only about 1% of us don’t use a bag or cart. And 5% of us use some kind of bag we’ve repurposed for disc golf. Everyone else has at least a small bag. About 20 % of us have a cart of some kind.  Only about 11% of us use a large style bag.

Comment Below

 

What is your most important accessory? The one thing you couldn’t imagine playing disc golf without? Let us know in the comments below and we can see what accessory you value the most.

How Stable Are Your Discs?

The State of Disc Golf 2021

 

The Stability of Discs in our Bags

 

In our continuing series highlighting the results of our annual State of Disc Golf survey, this week we take a look at the stabilities of our discs. We will also discuss the term stability and how the language of disc golf can be unclear in regards to the stability of a disc. Then we will take a peek inside our bags to see the discs we throw and how stable they are.

 

Learning the Flight Ratings

 

One of the things we learn about discs when we are starting out playing disc golf is that the flight of the disc is important, and we need to learn about the how ours fly. Depending on how much coaching we got when we first started, a lot of us went for the ‘fast’ or ‘high speed’ discs because we wanted the discs to fly out of our hands at a high rate of speed. Since we were selecting our molds randomly, we undoubtedly ended up with discs that would do nothing but hang a sharp left turn (for right-handed players who throw back-hand shots, or ‘RHBH’). Over time, we learned that discs have a general flight rating and found out that the common four-number flight rating or the single digit flight rating can be used to tell us how our discs will fly. Most of us came to embrace the rating system and would frequently use it to guide our purchases. No longer were we buying discs because of the flight description stamped on the disc. Instead, were now using those flight ratings to help us fill gaps in our bags. No, the flight numbers are not always exactly how the disc flies. But it’s the best we have.

 

Learning the Language

 

In addition to the variability of flight numbers versus the actual flight of the disc, the sport’s lexicon has a glaring issue that regularly calls for clarity. That is the issue of ‘stability’. If someone comes into Infinite Discs and tells us that they are looking for a new midrange that is a little more stable, we don’t exactly know what they are looking for until we find out what they are replacing. Is there old midrange worn and too flippy, and they are looking for something a little less understable? Or, are they throwing a Justice that they just can’t get any distance with, so they are looking for something less overstable?

Although typically, what people are referring to when they say more or less stable is ‘straighter’. We would still need to clarify exactly what they are looking for, rather than selling them an Anubis and sending them out to play.

In Our Bags

 

For our survey, we wondered what the make-up of people’s bags were as far as the stability is concerned. We let participants decide what is overstable or understable. The same disc has different flights for different people. We broke the categories into disc types: distance drivers, fairway drivers, midranges and putters. We asked ‘What stabilities of discs are in your bag? [for the given disc type]’. Let’s look at the results.

Distance Drivers

 

The first type of disc we’ll look at is distance drivers. We asked how many of each of five stabilities do you carry, from Very Overstable to Very Understable. Since most people carry a variety of distance drivers, people were allowed to select all stabilities that applied to them. This chart shows the percentage of people who carry at least one of these stabilities. As an example, the survey shows that 69% of us carry a straight/stable distance driver, as show in the chart below. Here are all the distance driver results:

 

 

 

It is not too surprising to see that a majority of us don’t carry the extreme stabilities. Most of us can come close to mimicking the flight of a very overstable or very understable disc, with something close. Even so, that leaves a lot of us that just want that ultra-meat hook or ultra-flippy disc. I broke the numbers down to see what percentage chance we have of carrying discs with the given stability and here is what I found. Naturally, the chart will look similar to the previous one. This just gives us a snapshot of an average individual bag.

 

 

One and Only Stability

 

In looking at the spreadsheet with the data, I was curious about how many of us carry drivers with only one stability. I was surprised at how big the number was. It was a lot more than I see with our club members. Here is the chart with the date:

 

 

My first thought was that there were a lot of beginners who just didn’t carry a lot of discs. So I broke the 28% down into reported skill levels and found out that I was pretty accurate in my assessment. People who called themselves Beginners or even Intermediate made up 85% of the people who only have one stability for their distance drivers. Here is the chart:

 

 

Control Drivers

 

Now let’s look at the data for fairway drivers.  There were slightly fewer people who carry over and understable discs, and a decent amount more that carry straight/stable discs. The extreme stabilities are the outliers again, with similar numbers to the distance drivers.

 

 

And again let’s look at what makes up an average bag with fairway drivers. Again, similar to the chart above. And not a huge difference between fairway and distance drivers.

 

 

Midrange Stability

 

Let’s see if midranges tell a different story. The chart below indicates that there is a bit more difference when it comes to the stability of midranges. Straight/stable mids reign supreme, but with even larger numbers. And mostly at the expense of the extreme stabilities again. Far fewer people throw very understable mids.

 

 

Distilling those numbers down we look at the average bag for mids:

 

 

The Kon Tiki

 

With over 27% of us throwing understable to very understable discs, it will be interesting to see the reception for the new understable Infinite mold, the Kon Tiki. I assure you, the timing of this post was purely coincidental! As of this writing, the Kon Tiki is a brand new release

 

Putt Putt

 

Moving on to the category I was most curious about, the stability of putters. As you can see from the chart below, the straight/stable category is closest to 100% of any disc type. Based on the guys I throw with, that seems spot on. So do the very overstable/overstable categories, which represents a combined 70% of us. The ‘very understable’ is the smallest of all the disc types.

 

 

Using the information to graph an average bag, here are the results.

 

 

I thought the ‘very overstable’ category might be a tad higher, and I wouldn’t have been surprised if it were a lot higher, due to how many people drive with putters, and like them as stable as can be. Like so many categories we’ve looked at, I think people go with the overstable disc and just make it work. Also, putters had the highest number of people who only throw one stability, with 40% of us only bagging one. That includes me and my R-Pro Dart!

 

 

 

There is a look at our bags and the stabilities we carry. There are sub-categories that we could explore, such as the make-up of a pro’s bag vs a beginner/rec player’s bag. But, we’ll have to address that in another blog. Until then, throw what you love!

 

Comment below and let us know about the stability of discs in your bag. Do you have Very Overstable or Very Understable discs?

Sune Sports – A New Manufacturer

Sune Sports is a sporting goods company based in Norway. As a relatively new company, they are currently focusing on beginners and casual players. By providing a wide array of discs that are all easy to throw, affordable, and light weight. They have 8 molds, all of which are available on our website: infinitediscs.com/category/Sune-Sport#. These molds will come in one or two plastic types; S-Plastic or Safety Line.

 

S-Plastic

This plastic is an affordable light weight base plastic blend similar to Innova DX or Discraft Pro-D. S-Plastic often comes in a Light Edition where the weights are low, typically in the 150-165 gram range.

Safety Line

Safety Line plastic is ultra soft, designed to help prevent injuries when kids and inexperienced players try disc golf for the first time.

All discs in this line come in ultra light weights which increases their safety and makes them especially friendly for beginners and children. These discs also float in water making them perfect for a crowded round of beach golf.

Putters

Cumulus

The Cumulus is a light weight easy to throw putter available in an ultra soft plastic blend. The plastic used is so flexible that you can literally fold the Cumulus in half. This is a beadless putter with a flat top.

This putt and approach disc is perfect for children and others just learning disc golf.

The Cumulus will float in water.

 

Flow Motion

The Motion is a flat top beadless putter with a sable flight path. This putt and approach disc works well for both approach shots and short putts.

This is an excellent all purpose putter for players of all skill levels.

 

 

Midranges

Cirrus

The Sune Sport Cirrus is a slow speed midrange with a thin rim, low profile, and flat top.

This midrange disc is very similar to the Cumulus. It is available in ultra soft, flexible, light weight plastic and is ideal for children.

 

Mad Mission

The Sune Sport Mad Mission is a stable flying approach midrange with a flat top and thin rim. This disc excels for short drives and consistent approach shots.

 

 

 

Silent Cruiser

The Sune Sport Silent Cruiser Midrange is an overstable utility disc designed to fade hard. This disc

is classified as a midrange but has a rim configuration more similar to a driver.

 

 

Control Drivers

Contrail

The Contrail is an ultra light weight super soft fairway driver designed for beginners.

This easy to throw fairway driver is incredibly flexible and will fold in half. It also floats in water. The Contrail is a great driver to use for children and school group disc golf instruction.

 

Night Trooper

The Night Trooper is an easy to throw fairway driver designed to give new disc golfers maximum distance and control.

 

 

 

Distance Drivers

Short Slacker

The Short Slacker is a low profile beginner friendly distance driver designed to give growing players more distance than the driver found in the starter set.

When thrown with high speeds the Short Slacker exhibits a significant amount of high speed turn for gliding S-Curve flight paths. New players will find that the Short Slacker has a significant amount of low speed end of flight fade.

Ript Showdown

If you’re familiar with Ript Revenge Disc Golf Card game, then you should look into their new card game: Ript Showdown! This is available on InifniteDiscs.com for $8.99.

Are you Good, Bad, or Lucky? Ript Showdown features double sided cards allowing Disc Golfers to choose a side to play based on their style. Will you be Good and play a defensive game, or Bad and attack your opponents mercilessly? Either way, you hope to be the Lucky in the end and pull off a win. Showdown features all of the cards you love from Ript, Ript Revenge, as well as all new cards.

Play While You Disc Golf – Add some spice to your disc golf game! Best played with 2-4 players. Choose weather to play Defensively or Aggressively, as the cards you play will modify your round. May the best score win!

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